Hacktivist groups targeting organisations

Hacktivism is a way of protesting, and it is motivated by ideology, religion, social causes or political opinions. A hacktivist group is a loosely associated international collective which only exists online. Hacktivist groups launch activism operations or campaigns against government organisations and corporate online systems. Some groups are organised using dark web forums and websites, while others simply coordinate their efforts through Twitter.

Discussion channels within the dark web, such as AnonOps Internet Relay Chat and Anonymous CyberGuerrilla, are used to coordinate hacktivist attacks and share attack tools.

Discussion channels within the dark web, such as AnonOps Internet Relay Chat and Anonymous CyberGuerrilla, are used to coordinate hacktivist attacks and share attack tools.

The first step of a hacktivist campaign is to publish a manifesto. A manifesto is a declaration of the intentions and motives of a hacktivist campaign. Hacktivists publish their manifestos online and share them on social media. They explain their motives and intentions to achieve public acceptance and attract as many hackers as possible to join the protest.

Money does not serve as motivation to join a hacktivist group. Instead, hacktivism is a way of protesting, and it is motivated by ideology, religion, social causes or political opinions. Even several local protests have an aspect of global cyber hacktivism. For example, in 2012, the hacker collective Anonymous drew attention to the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda and attacked several government websites.

The second step of the campaign is to target online services with cyberattacks in order to steal sensitive data or cause disruption to the target organisation. If other hacking means fail, the online services are taken down through a series of distributed denial-of-service attacks. After these attacks interfere with online services, the hacktivist group publishes new targets.

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